Topical Sermon

TOPICAL SERMON provides an example of a topical sermon and explains how to write a topical sermon.


How To Write A Topical Sermon

Topical sermons are usually developed from a topic that comes from a passage or passages of Scripture. For example, you want to prepare and present a topical sermon on spiritual warfare.

Sermon Topic

You may develop the sermon topic Winning the Spiritual Battles In Our Lives. This sermon topic Winning Spiritual Battles In Our Lives become the main preaching point. Every sub-point you present will expand and explain the main preaching point of the sermon.

Sermon Sub-points

The Bible tells you that winning spiritual battles in your live involves realizing that you have three enemies, two battle fronts, and two weapons.

Therefore, you may develop these into three sermon sub-points.

  1. Realizing that we have three enemies
  2. Realizing that we have two battle fronts
  3. Realizing that we have two weapons

You now have a sermon topic or main preaching point and sermon sub-points. But how do you LINK the sermon topic with the sermon sub-points?


Linking Sermon Topic With Sermon Sub-points

Linking a sermon topic with sermon sub-points requires a HINGE word. The hinge word must be a PLURAL noun. For example, to link Winning The Spiritual Battles In Our Lives requires the hinge word insights or something similar. Therefore, your topical sermon would be as follows.

There are three insights into winning the spiritual battles in our lives. The first insight involves realizing that we have three enemies. The second insight involves realizing that we have two battle fronts. The third insight involves realizing that we have two weapons.

Your topical sermon is now taking shape. You have linked your main preaching point with your sermon sub-points.

Your topical sermon outline would look like this:

There are three insights into winning the spiritual battles in our lives. They involve…

  1. Realizing that we have three enemies

    1. The devil (1 Peter 5:8)
    2. The world (1 John 2:15-17)
    3. The Flesh or the sin nature (1 Peter 2:11)

  2. Realizing that we have two battle fronts

    1. Personal holiness (1 Peter 1:13-16)
    2. Personal witness (Matthew 28:19-20)

  3. Realizing that we have two weapons

    1. The Armor of God (Ephesians 6:11, 13)
    2. The Word of God (Ephesians 6:17)

Once you have linked your main preaching point with your sermon sub-points, you will need to expand and explain your sub-points. As you can see, the body of your sermon is complete. You now have a sermon outline you can preach to your congregation.

Of course, you will need to expand and explain your sermon outline with sermon content.

For more articles on how to write a sermon or a sermon outline, click on Free Religious Articles


Putting Your Topical Sermon Together

Now that the body of your topical sermon is complete, you will need to write an introduction and a conclusion. The introduction must introduce your main preaching point. Moreover, your conclusion must conclude your topical sermon.

Remember, a dynamic topical sermon must have a powerful introduction, an interesting body, and an unforgettable conclusion. Do these three parts well and you will prepare and preach powerfull sermons.



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